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Former law school chief,
Senate candidate indicted

11/20/2003 9:53 AM
By: Capital News 9 web staff

The founder of Vermont Law School in South Royalton, who is also a former Republican candidate for U.S. Senate, has been indicted by a federal grand jury for fraud.

Anthony Doria of South Royalton was charged with defrauding Barbara Umbrecht of Newport, New Hampshire, of more than $115,000 through a phony investment scheme.

No phone number could be found this morning for Doria, and he could not be reached for comment. Doria is charged with one count of mail fraud and four counts of transporting stolen property.

If convicted on all charges, he could face up to 25 years in prison and a $1 million fine.

Vermont Law School
Founder Indicted

November 21, 2003

By DAVID GRAM The Associated Press

MONTPELIER - Anthony Doria, the founder of Vermont Law School in South Royalton and a former Republican candidate for U.S. Senate, has been indicted by a federal grand jury for fraud.

Doria, 76, was charged with defrauding Barbara Umbrecht, a Newport, N.H., widow, of more than $115,000 through a phony investment scheme.

No phone number could be found for Doria, and he could not be reached for comment Thursday.

The office of U.S. Attorney Peter Hall said Thursday that the grand jury returned the indictment against Doria a day earlier. He was accused of one count of mail fraud and four counts of transporting stolen property.

If he is convicted on all the charges, Doria could face a prison term of up to 25 years and a $1.25 million fine.

"The charges allege that from November 1998 until January 2000, Doria took money, stocks and other assets belonging to Mrs. Umbrecht, with the promise that he would invest them in the North American Finance and Investment Co.," Hall's office said in a statement.

"Instead of investing these assets, the indictment alleges that Doria spent them on personal items," the statement said.

Umbrecht's lawyer, Ronald E. Lemay, filed a complaint in October 2000 charging that Doria manipulated Umbrecht into applying for credit cards that Doria then used for his own purposes.

The Claremont, N.H., Eagle Times reported in 2001 that a charge card, obtained in March 1999, was used to purchase gas and groceries, as well as luxury items including a $648 airplane ticket from New York to Rome, candy from a West Lebanon chocolate shop, dinners at a Montpelier restaurant and men's clothing from an Ohio clothier.

Umbrecht, a homemaker whose husband Wallace died in early 1998, granted Doria power of attorney in December of that year, court documents said.

Doria is the founder of Vermont Law School in South Royalton, Vermont's only school granting law degrees.

He also ran for the Republican nomination for the U.S. Senate in 1986, losing to former Gov. Richard Snelling who then lost to incumbent Democratic Sen. Patrick Leahy.